Featured Publication – Dusk in Bloom by Ava Patel

Our featured publication for July is Dusk in Bloom by Ava Patel, published by Prolebooks.

There’s an extremely accomplished voice that runs through all these poems, tying them together
and ensuring they talk to and build on one another. It’s as though the reader’s been given the key to
a parallel universe where there are extra colours in the rainbow. The consistently engaging imagery
in this gathering is also used for emotional ends. These urgent, intimate poems discover many devastatingly effective last lines. A polished and sophisticated debut
.” John McCullough

A Loss

I can’t remember beer gardens
at that time of year
when the weather hits just right.
I can’t remember blue lagoons

or early morning chicken wing grease
that won’t budge from fingertips.
I’m never going to hear my name
as one syllable again or smudge my lips

with peach juice. No one new
will sit at the kitchen table with me
and make haikus out of the grocery list,
or sigh when I sneak pineapples

into the shopping trolley.  Or go back to collect
the bits of me I forgot in beer gardens
and chicken shops.  Nobody wants to wipe
peach juice from my chin anymore.

Bluebs

Saturday night, highbush blueberries cry for spring
until their throats bleed juice.
I roll them between my fingers
and dream I’m squishing them flat,
dream I’m crawling into their bushes
and living a two-dimensional life with them
as we wait for the season to change.

Our lives mingle and morph

as we rub and ripen one another,
slinking into fresh beings without the worry of suspicion.

Saturday night, the moon splits itself into quicksilver
and infects the highbush blueberries,
painting them glistening globes.
We sleep late and wake early,
wet our lips and arch our feet in anxiety.
Fear drives us to unravel our futures
and discard them into fjords

that swallow our plans with the Sahara’s thirst.
We can’t risk bleeding blueberry into the sea,
so instead, we sit watching the tide,
snapping elastic bands wrapped around our wrists.

Rosebush

Daylight terrifies,
undoing the seams of my skirt.

It seeps into the scratches running down my arms,
the gashes latticed across my face.

A heartbeat’s steps slink a song along the garden path,
and a body curved soft like a petal,

pink as a milkshake,
tender in its sighs and moans,

prickles under the sky’s stare.

Previously published in SOUTH magazine

Paper Planes

A landslide brought me down into the depths of myself.

Foxes shrieked romance into the night
and I succumbed to an early morning start,
the streetlamps sputtering a wakeup call.

I spoke to the dawn tinged cats
as they chased their birds; I meowed to them my prayers,
keen for them to dismantle the paper aeroplanes
I had streaming through my head.

The planes had gone whoosh and swoop
and moaned that they were hungry for cheesy chips.

Clouds scented orange and coloured green
spaced themselves along my frontal lobe.
My nose led the way from one to another,
to a thousand set of myselves waiting to be unleashed,
the clamour of my beings brewing somewhere around, I’d say, my sternum.

And I’ve longed to have my appendix out for a long time now,
and almost prayed for a hospital’s walls, the sterile wards,
or a kind of upside down in between terrific dimension
full of electricity and cannabis and loose hinges and nuts and bolts.

Cats pilot my paper planes, sergeants on duty patrolling the night;
an outbreak of ornithophobia in the bedroom can be a real mood killer, you know?

Ava Patel is winner of Prole Magazine’s 2021 pamphlet competition with debut pamphlet ‘Dusk in Bloom’. She’s had some small successes being published in webzines (London Grip; Ink, Sweat and Tears; Atrium; Porridge) and magazines (South Bank Poetry; Orbis; SOUTH; Dream Catcher; New Welsh Reader). She runs an Instagram poetry page: @ava_poetics.


Dusk in Bloom is available to purchase from the Prole website.

Featured Publication – Robeson, Fitzgerald and Other Heroes by Robert Nisbet

Our featured publication for February is Robeson, Fitzgerald and Other Heroes by Robert Nisbet, published by Prolebooks.

The poems collected here are of an age, they are of a place – Wales, The Valleys and Southern peninsula – but their themes, their wit, the emotions they elicit are universal. Amongst the nostalgia, the musical connections, these poems are peopled with unforgettable characters and their stories are told through a poet’s honed craft, and at times, with a wicked humour.

‘Throughout, the people and their stories that populate these pages are vivid and authentic, the emotional force cleanly depicted with concrete imagery and language that rarely disappears into abstraction, and therefore holds your attention closely. I read the whole thing in one sitting and never felt bored. Which is as good as it gets, really.’ Paul Vaughan, Algebra of Owls.

Robson, Fitzgerald and other heroes

 

Epiphanies

Three cars, unwittingly together, drive
off the motorway and into Pembrokeshire.
The BMW has its family, a nucleus,
and Mum sifts notes on a priory hereabouts,
the burial chamber, Iron Age fort. The region
is renowned, she tells them, for spiritual things.

The Fiesta, overtaken earlier, straggles.
The couple here are younger (not that young,
certainly, but eager, newly together).
They stop in a clearing, their embrace takes in
the smell of hawthorn, farmland after rain.

The Astra from Rotherham is pumped full
of little children, iPods, Gameboys, games.
Since the motorway, the kids have vaguely
clocked cows and sheep and stuff, but
now, just past Brynberian, a herd of cows
(a hundred head) crosses their path,
off to milking. The Astra stops and ponders,
but one cow detaches herself, nuzzles
a side window, and Jason, aged nine,
is eyeball to bloodshot eyeball with a
fucking great cow. The cow (and she too
has a name, Jason, she’s Rhiannon
and she’s a Friesian) rubs and bumps
the window with her trumpet of a nose,
and exhales enormously.
Jason, now mistily obliterated,
will remember this moment
for the rest of his bloody life.

 

As You Like It in the Bishop’s Palace
An open-air production in St. David’s
 
A coastal summer and cathedral bells
and the rooks’ hauteur give us this night in Bardic country.
Foreground, romance in a forest.

From the back row of canvas chairs
they watch, they two.
They have not yet adventured.
But the voice of the lovers is reaching them
from the forest, from the palace,
and as eight o’clock deepens to a cooler nine
they draw the blanket more around themselves,
nestle.

Rosalind and Orlando are eighteen, nineteen,
but grown to love’s confidence
in the play’s disguise.
The playwright stakes out his promise:
Hang there, my verse, in witness of my love.
 
The watching two are in thrall.
Their hands, beneath the blanket,
steal together, clasp,
as in the happy ending of a play.

 

A Sudden Summer Sun on St. Bride’s Bay

Towels and Colas gritted by the sand,
more brown than golden sand on a day when
a warm bluster of westerly wind
is the beach’s feature.

She is just shy, gauche really, seventeen.
She just does not want
to walk down the beach on such spindle shanks,
such sad bare legs exposed

She huddles behind the windbreak until
the Mediterranean moment
when the sun rushes out, just as she peels her way
through the spider-written letter
from the boy from France.

……………………………………………………………………..(What do we know of him? Seventeen also.
…………………………………………………………………………………………………Not gauche but not adroit.
………………………………………………………………………………………. Loves languages and music and,
……………………………………………………………………………. in the grace of a reserved adolescence,
…………………………………………………………………………….loves the girl to the point of adoration.)

She reads his civilities, pleased, and then the phrase,
If I cannot become to see you this August,
my summer, he will be ruined 

and she flowers, and walks,
on nicely-rounded spindle legs,
to the water, in the sun,
feeling herself a mademoiselle,
a mannequin, a belle.

 

Previous publication credits are Smiths Knoll, Scintilla, and Snakeskin/Shortlist for the Wordsworth Trust Prize 2017, respectively. 

Robert Nisbet is from Pembrokeshire, teaches creative writing to a range of classes and has been publishing poetry widely in Britain and the USA for 12 years. In 2017 he was shortlisted for the Wordsworth Trust Prize and his short collection, Robeson, Fitzgerald and Other Heroes, was published as the winner of the Prole Pamphlet competition.

Robeson, Fitzgerald and Other Heroes is available to buy from www.prolebooks.co.uk